Blog | Pumeli Curated Gift Boxes

From holiday gift guides and DIY gifting to gift giving etiquette, product launches and introduction to artisan and makers, stay in the know with the Pumeli curated gift box blog. 

Gifts for Sleep Lovers

This gifting season; indulge your sleeping beauty with tranquil gifts. Featuring relaxing aromas and serene design, here are 8 luxurious holiday gifts that deliver a great night's sleep.

Holiday Gifts for Sleep Lovers & Insomniacs

Sleeping Beauty Pillow Spray: Crafted with essential oils, including chamomile, clary sage and French lavender, this cruelty-free linen spray is designed to promote a peaceful slumber. $18

Pure Essential Oils: Ylang Ylang and Cedarwood essential oils are a natural and delightful way to support a peaceful and restful sleep. These premium essential oils from Vitruvi are 100% pure. $10 and up

Japanese Cypress Scent Diffuser: This handmade essential oil diffuser is a beautiful and minimal accessory for bringing scent into the home or office. Crafted from the Hinoki tree, this natural diffuser requires no electricity or batteries and includes a discreet storage space for your essential oil bottle. $25

Lavender Bath Salts: Grown in California’s Santa Ynez Valley, Lavande Farm bath salts contain only two ingredients for a soothing and relaxing bath before bedtime: natural sea salt and lavender essential oil. $20

Chamomile Herbal Tea: Soothing and sweet, this organically grown Chamomile is infused with notes of fig and honey. Free of caffeine, and full of smooth flavor. $18

“Pause” Mug: This delightful dimpled ceramic mug will warm your hands and the inscription, “Pause”, will serve as a reminder to slow down and unwind from a hectic day. $15

Tonka Noir Glass Candle: This luxuriously thick glass creates a soothing ambience with its luminous obmre effect and blend of smoky Madagascar vanilla with sandalwood, known for promoting calm and relaxation. $30

Silk Eye Pillow: This flaxseed and lavender eye pillow is perfectly weighted for gentle relaxation. Use for meditation or yoga before bedtime.  $26

Ready to design your own Sleep Lover’s box? Visit our Create a Gift builder to get started.

 Originally Published: December 4, 2017

Updated: November 5, 2018

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This gifting season; indulge your sleeping beauty with tranquil gifts. Featuring relaxing aromas and serene design, here are 8 luxurious holiday gifts that deliver a great night's sleep.

Holiday Gifts for Sleep Lovers & Insomniacs

Sleeping Beauty Pillow Spray: Crafted with essential oils, including chamomile, clary sage and French lavender, this cruelty-free linen spray is designed to promote a peaceful slumber. $18

Pure Essential Oils: Ylang Ylang and Cedarwood essential oils are a natural and delightful way to support a peaceful and restful sleep. These premium essential oils from Vitruvi are 100% pure. $10 and up

Japanese Cypress Scent Diffuser: This handmade essential oil diffuser is a beautiful and minimal accessory for bringing scent into the home or office. Crafted from the Hinoki tree, this natural diffuser requires no electricity or batteries and includes a discreet storage space for your essential oil bottle. $25

Lavender Bath Salts: Grown in California’s Santa Ynez Valley, Lavande Farm bath salts contain only two ingredients for a soothing and relaxing bath before bedtime: natural sea salt and lavender essential oil. $20

Chamomile Herbal Tea: Soothing and sweet, this organically grown Chamomile is infused with notes of fig and honey. Free of caffeine, and full of smooth flavor. $18

“Pause” Mug: This delightful dimpled ceramic mug will warm your hands and the inscription, “Pause”, will serve as a reminder to slow down and unwind from a hectic day. $15

Tonka Noir Glass Candle: This luxuriously thick glass creates a soothing ambience with its luminous obmre effect and blend of smoky Madagascar vanilla with sandalwood, known for promoting calm and relaxation. $30

Silk Eye Pillow: This flaxseed and lavender eye pillow is perfectly weighted for gentle relaxation. Use for meditation or yoga before bedtime.  $26

Ready to design your own Sleep Lover’s box? Visit our Create a Gift builder to get started.

 Originally Published: December 4, 2017

Updated: November 5, 2018

Read more


How to Use An Eye Pillow for Stress Relief & Sleep

Lavender has long been used in aromatherapy rituals around the world. For over 2500 years this beautiful and fragrant flower has been linked to relaxation and stress relief. From ancient Egypt to the Victorian era to modern day, lavender has been used in everything from perfumes and sachets to antiseptics, cooking and tea.

 When used as a fill for a silk eye pillow, Lavender can relieve headaches, soothe tired muscles, aid in meditation and help improve sleep. According to Bo Forbes, an integrative yoga therapist, an “eye pillow is one of the most powerful tools for healing, health and happiness.”*

Here are three ways to use your eye pillow for medicinal and meditative purpose.

Quiet your mind

Let’s be honest, whether you’re going for total relaxation with the savasana pose or practicing meditation, sometimes it’s hard to block out all of the distractions and keep your anxious mind from wandering. A lavender and flaxseed eye pillow will not only help block out the light, but the antioxidants in lavender can help lower your stress hormones and create a calm and peaceful atmosphere to help you let go. This can also be used to prepare your mind and body for a long and restful night’s sleep.

lavender

 Reduce puffy eyes with a cold compress

Relieve tired and strained eyes caused by a long day staring at screens. Using the sealed zip pouch that came with your eye pillow simply put the pillow in the fridge or freezer for 20-30 minutes. Rest the soft and cool pillow on your eyes for 10-20 minutes and let the essence of lavender calm your mind.

Relieve achy muscles with heat therapy

Don’t let the word “eye” fool you into believing you can only use the pillow for your eyes. With the therapeutic properties of lavender and the flexible shape, it’s easy to adapt the pillow for use anywhere you need a little relief. Just warm the pillow in the microwave for 30-60 seconds and apply it to the painful area, such as your stiff neck or sore knee. Just make sure it’s not too hot before you place it on your skin.

Products featuring a lavender & flaxseed eye pillow:

 

 

*Source:

https://www.yogajournal.com/yoga-101/happiness-toolkit-eye-pillow-stress-rx

Read more

Lavender has long been used in aromatherapy rituals around the world. For over 2500 years this beautiful and fragrant flower has been linked to relaxation and stress relief. From ancient Egypt to the Victorian era to modern day, lavender has been used in everything from perfumes and sachets to antiseptics, cooking and tea.

 When used as a fill for a silk eye pillow, Lavender can relieve headaches, soothe tired muscles, aid in meditation and help improve sleep. According to Bo Forbes, an integrative yoga therapist, an “eye pillow is one of the most powerful tools for healing, health and happiness.”*

Here are three ways to use your eye pillow for medicinal and meditative purpose.

Quiet your mind

Let’s be honest, whether you’re going for total relaxation with the savasana pose or practicing meditation, sometimes it’s hard to block out all of the distractions and keep your anxious mind from wandering. A lavender and flaxseed eye pillow will not only help block out the light, but the antioxidants in lavender can help lower your stress hormones and create a calm and peaceful atmosphere to help you let go. This can also be used to prepare your mind and body for a long and restful night’s sleep.

lavender

 Reduce puffy eyes with a cold compress

Relieve tired and strained eyes caused by a long day staring at screens. Using the sealed zip pouch that came with your eye pillow simply put the pillow in the fridge or freezer for 20-30 minutes. Rest the soft and cool pillow on your eyes for 10-20 minutes and let the essence of lavender calm your mind.

Relieve achy muscles with heat therapy

Don’t let the word “eye” fool you into believing you can only use the pillow for your eyes. With the therapeutic properties of lavender and the flexible shape, it’s easy to adapt the pillow for use anywhere you need a little relief. Just warm the pillow in the microwave for 30-60 seconds and apply it to the painful area, such as your stiff neck or sore knee. Just make sure it’s not too hot before you place it on your skin.

Products featuring a lavender & flaxseed eye pillow:

 

 

*Source:

https://www.yogajournal.com/yoga-101/happiness-toolkit-eye-pillow-stress-rx

Read more


How to Express Heartfelt Sympathy

As floral and gift designers, we help people celebrate life events big and small. So often we talk about the joyous occasions—the birth of a newborn baby, a wedding event, a new home or client appreciation. But the truth is, we’re also entrusted to help people express themselves during those difficult times—the loss of a parent, a friend or a beloved pet. Those moments when there is a great desire to reach out and make a thoughtful gesture to someone and when the right words seemingly disappear.

In times of mourning and sadness, a personal gesture to friends, family and even acquaintances can be most comforting. But how do you know what to say when someone passes away?

The most important thing to remember is the purpose of your expression is to provide support and kindness to those who are experiencing a profound pain. As Maya Angelou said, “try to be a rainbow in someone else’s cloud.”

Dealing with loss

Know that you alone will not be able to heal their pain. And you must not let the worry of figuring out the perfect thing to say stop you from making a connection or, worse, keep you silent. Even though it is difficult to know exactly what to say to someone who is feeling alone and grieving, your condolences will likely mean more than you know both now and in the future.

We know reaching out with condolences isn’t easy. And knowing where and how to start is often the hardest part. We’ve compiled these suggestions to help you get started with expressing your own heartfelt sympathy to someone who is in mourning. Use these tips as is or as a guideline to craft your own message.

What to say in a sympathy card

Etiquette purists may disagree, but we believe there’s no right or wrong way to write your condolences as long as it’s genuine and sincere.

Choose a nice piece of writing paper or a beautiful card and, whenever possible, handwrite your note. These small details will let the recipient know you spent time thinking about them and help to convey the warm and caring tone of your message, no matter how brief.

Handwritten Note

We find it’s easiest to begin with “I’m so sorry for your loss”. Depending upon your relationship to the deceased or the surviving families, it may be helpful to slightly tailor your message to frame the context for the relationship, especially if you’re not close to the family.

For example, if a coworker has passed away, you may say, “Your husband was a wonderful person and colleague. I learned so much from him in the last 10 years and he will be missed.”

For a friend’s Mother, you may write, “I know your Mom was an inspiring person through all of the amazing stories you shared with me in college. I know you will miss her deeply.”

For a pet: “I know ___________ brought you so much love & joy. I’m so sorry for your loss.”

Other words you may want to include: My thoughts are with you – We are thinking of You – Our hearts go out to you and your family.

Whether you opt for a pre-printed greeting card, or draft one entirely from scratch, close your message “With sympathy,” or “With love,” followed by your signature.

 A note about what not to say….

There are also a few things you should avoid including in your sympathy message. These include, expressing shock at how horrible the loss is, reminding the surviving loved ones how terrible it is that someone was taken so soon, proclaiming to know exactly how they feel, making predictions about when or if they will feel better, offering biblical passages and other religious comfort to someone who isn’t religious, or trying to find an explanation or cause for death.  Trust us, they are already struggling with these things and the last thing they need is an exclamation point on it in the form of a reminder.

When in doubt, keep it simple and speak from your compassionate heart.

Offer to Help

Depending upon your relationship to the surviving family and your proximity, you may wish to offer help.

You can add your offer to help in your sympathy card and/or follow up by phone. Some may find it difficult to accept help and so you might offer them some specific suggestions. For example, you may wish to write “If there is anything we can do during this difficult time, such as taking over your school carpool duties next week or stopping by with a ready to bake vegetarian meal, please do let us know.”

Being specific with your offer, makes it easier to accept and easier to follow through. Don’t worry about your offer to help being too small. When someone is grieving, they have many things to take care of, including themselves, and ordinary tasks, such as mowing the lawn, can seem overwhelming.

Sending Flowers

Before sending flowers, find out of there is a notice that no flowers are sent. In the past, these notices were printed in the newspaper. Today, you may need to find out from a close family member or contact the funeral home to understand the survivor’s wishes. This may even be communicated on social media or other online guest book.

flowers

Typically the family, or groups of people (such as coworkers), may send large arrangements to the funeral home. The family and the funeral director will decide which arrangements are brought to the church if having a church service. Do not bring flowers with you unless they are already in a vase. If you bring them with you, seek out and give them directly to the funeral director. It is important that your card be attached and ideally list a description of the arrangement on the back of the card. Trained florists will do this for you and it helps the family to acknowledge your gift in a thank you note as sometimes the cards will be separated from the flowers, especially when it is time to dispose of them which may be long before the thank you note is written.

Smaller arrangements and plants may also be sent to the home a few days after the services along with a short note. Even if several weeks have passed, it is still fine to send something to the home. It may be a welcome and comforting gift once the initial days of misery have settled down a bit. Don’t worry about trying to send flowers to the home before the services. Often times the family is out and about making arrangements and it is difficult to find an appropriate delivery time.

Giving a Gift

While flowers are the most traditional way to acknowledge sympathy, gifts may also be sent to express your condolences. Most commonly, we find gifts being sent to someone close, such as a friend or co-worker, who is grieving regardless of whether or not the giver personally knows the deceased.

 


Gifts for the grieving typically include thoughtful items for self-care and relaxation, such as candles, soaps and journals. During times of mourning, a thoughtful gift is a way to let someone know you are thinking of them and offer your support for their healing process. Gifts are not sent to the funeral home or to the church. They are either given directly to the recipient or sent by post to their home, along with a sympathy card. Like flowers, a gift can be sent days, even weeks, after the burial.

 

Read more

As floral and gift designers, we help people celebrate life events big and small. So often we talk about the joyous occasions—the birth of a newborn baby, a wedding event, a new home or client appreciation. But the truth is, we’re also entrusted to help people express themselves during those difficult times—the loss of a parent, a friend or a beloved pet. Those moments when there is a great desire to reach out and make a thoughtful gesture to someone and when the right words seemingly disappear.

In times of mourning and sadness, a personal gesture to friends, family and even acquaintances can be most comforting. But how do you know what to say when someone passes away?

The most important thing to remember is the purpose of your expression is to provide support and kindness to those who are experiencing a profound pain. As Maya Angelou said, “try to be a rainbow in someone else’s cloud.”

Dealing with loss

Know that you alone will not be able to heal their pain. And you must not let the worry of figuring out the perfect thing to say stop you from making a connection or, worse, keep you silent. Even though it is difficult to know exactly what to say to someone who is feeling alone and grieving, your condolences will likely mean more than you know both now and in the future.

We know reaching out with condolences isn’t easy. And knowing where and how to start is often the hardest part. We’ve compiled these suggestions to help you get started with expressing your own heartfelt sympathy to someone who is in mourning. Use these tips as is or as a guideline to craft your own message.

What to say in a sympathy card

Etiquette purists may disagree, but we believe there’s no right or wrong way to write your condolences as long as it’s genuine and sincere.

Choose a nice piece of writing paper or a beautiful card and, whenever possible, handwrite your note. These small details will let the recipient know you spent time thinking about them and help to convey the warm and caring tone of your message, no matter how brief.

Handwritten Note

We find it’s easiest to begin with “I’m so sorry for your loss”. Depending upon your relationship to the deceased or the surviving families, it may be helpful to slightly tailor your message to frame the context for the relationship, especially if you’re not close to the family.

For example, if a coworker has passed away, you may say, “Your husband was a wonderful person and colleague. I learned so much from him in the last 10 years and he will be missed.”

For a friend’s Mother, you may write, “I know your Mom was an inspiring person through all of the amazing stories you shared with me in college. I know you will miss her deeply.”

For a pet: “I know ___________ brought you so much love & joy. I’m so sorry for your loss.”

Other words you may want to include: My thoughts are with you – We are thinking of You – Our hearts go out to you and your family.

Whether you opt for a pre-printed greeting card, or draft one entirely from scratch, close your message “With sympathy,” or “With love,” followed by your signature.

 A note about what not to say….

There are also a few things you should avoid including in your sympathy message. These include, expressing shock at how horrible the loss is, reminding the surviving loved ones how terrible it is that someone was taken so soon, proclaiming to know exactly how they feel, making predictions about when or if they will feel better, offering biblical passages and other religious comfort to someone who isn’t religious, or trying to find an explanation or cause for death.  Trust us, they are already struggling with these things and the last thing they need is an exclamation point on it in the form of a reminder.

When in doubt, keep it simple and speak from your compassionate heart.

Offer to Help

Depending upon your relationship to the surviving family and your proximity, you may wish to offer help.

You can add your offer to help in your sympathy card and/or follow up by phone. Some may find it difficult to accept help and so you might offer them some specific suggestions. For example, you may wish to write “If there is anything we can do during this difficult time, such as taking over your school carpool duties next week or stopping by with a ready to bake vegetarian meal, please do let us know.”

Being specific with your offer, makes it easier to accept and easier to follow through. Don’t worry about your offer to help being too small. When someone is grieving, they have many things to take care of, including themselves, and ordinary tasks, such as mowing the lawn, can seem overwhelming.

Sending Flowers

Before sending flowers, find out of there is a notice that no flowers are sent. In the past, these notices were printed in the newspaper. Today, you may need to find out from a close family member or contact the funeral home to understand the survivor’s wishes. This may even be communicated on social media or other online guest book.

flowers

Typically the family, or groups of people (such as coworkers), may send large arrangements to the funeral home. The family and the funeral director will decide which arrangements are brought to the church if having a church service. Do not bring flowers with you unless they are already in a vase. If you bring them with you, seek out and give them directly to the funeral director. It is important that your card be attached and ideally list a description of the arrangement on the back of the card. Trained florists will do this for you and it helps the family to acknowledge your gift in a thank you note as sometimes the cards will be separated from the flowers, especially when it is time to dispose of them which may be long before the thank you note is written.

Smaller arrangements and plants may also be sent to the home a few days after the services along with a short note. Even if several weeks have passed, it is still fine to send something to the home. It may be a welcome and comforting gift once the initial days of misery have settled down a bit. Don’t worry about trying to send flowers to the home before the services. Often times the family is out and about making arrangements and it is difficult to find an appropriate delivery time.

Giving a Gift

While flowers are the most traditional way to acknowledge sympathy, gifts may also be sent to express your condolences. Most commonly, we find gifts being sent to someone close, such as a friend or co-worker, who is grieving regardless of whether or not the giver personally knows the deceased.

 


Gifts for the grieving typically include thoughtful items for self-care and relaxation, such as candles, soaps and journals. During times of mourning, a thoughtful gift is a way to let someone know you are thinking of them and offer your support for their healing process. Gifts are not sent to the funeral home or to the church. They are either given directly to the recipient or sent by post to their home, along with a sympathy card. Like flowers, a gift can be sent days, even weeks, after the burial.

 

Read more


5 Ways to Relax on National Relaxation Day + Giveaway

Let's be honest. Most of us these days are far too connected. Even when we "take a break" we're posting photos to Instagram and sharing stories on Snapchat. We're bombarded with information and 2-dimensional screens. It's nice to have access to so much information at our fingertips, but too much of it can be a little overwhelming.

It's not good for the soul, or our health, to be so busy. We need some relaxation, some real downtime, away from the constant connection to the modern world. We need space for physical reality—three-dimensional life that we can touch and smell and taste, not only see and hear. 

True wellness requires times of quiet for refreshing the mind and the spirit, and not only when we're asleep.

To do this we have to unplug with intention. This National Relaxation Day (8/15) choose to set aside some time when there will be no television, no radio, no Internet via smartphone or tablet or laptop, and no interruptions either by phone or in person. 

Simply sit and enjoy the quietude for half an hour listening to the sounds around you. If you’re just too much of a multi-tasker to imagine that, at least do something to luxuriate and pamper yourself at the same time.

Here are 5 ways to relax in as little as 10-15 minutes that will leave you feeling refreshed and renewed:

  1. Soothe your soles with a mint green tea foot soak
  2. Turn your teatime into a calming ritual
  3. Renew your skin with a matcha face mask
  4. Relieve stress and get into the creative flow with adult coloring books
  5. Create your own scent therapy using your favorite scented flower, candle or spice. Close your eyes and practice deep breathing for a few minutes, while you embrace the aromas.

Most importantly, allow yourself time for relaxation and self-care without the guilt. If not for yourself, do it for those who rely on you to be well and healthy such as your family, co-workers and even your pets. 

Want to give your daily self-care routine an immediate boost? Follow us on instagram and participate in our Loop Giveaway. We’ve partnered with 3 inspiring wellness & lifestyle brands to create an amazing pampering bundle valued at more than $150. See the rules and details on our giveaway post.

Self care Giveaway

Want even more self-care ideas? Check out 20 Ways to Relax Without Spending a Dime!

Read more

Let's be honest. Most of us these days are far too connected. Even when we "take a break" we're posting photos to Instagram and sharing stories on Snapchat. We're bombarded with information and 2-dimensional screens. It's nice to have access to so much information at our fingertips, but too much of it can be a little overwhelming.

It's not good for the soul, or our health, to be so busy. We need some relaxation, some real downtime, away from the constant connection to the modern world. We need space for physical reality—three-dimensional life that we can touch and smell and taste, not only see and hear. 

True wellness requires times of quiet for refreshing the mind and the spirit, and not only when we're asleep.

To do this we have to unplug with intention. This National Relaxation Day (8/15) choose to set aside some time when there will be no television, no radio, no Internet via smartphone or tablet or laptop, and no interruptions either by phone or in person. 

Simply sit and enjoy the quietude for half an hour listening to the sounds around you. If you’re just too much of a multi-tasker to imagine that, at least do something to luxuriate and pamper yourself at the same time.

Here are 5 ways to relax in as little as 10-15 minutes that will leave you feeling refreshed and renewed:

  1. Soothe your soles with a mint green tea foot soak
  2. Turn your teatime into a calming ritual
  3. Renew your skin with a matcha face mask
  4. Relieve stress and get into the creative flow with adult coloring books
  5. Create your own scent therapy using your favorite scented flower, candle or spice. Close your eyes and practice deep breathing for a few minutes, while you embrace the aromas.

Most importantly, allow yourself time for relaxation and self-care without the guilt. If not for yourself, do it for those who rely on you to be well and healthy such as your family, co-workers and even your pets. 

Want to give your daily self-care routine an immediate boost? Follow us on instagram and participate in our Loop Giveaway. We’ve partnered with 3 inspiring wellness & lifestyle brands to create an amazing pampering bundle valued at more than $150. See the rules and details on our giveaway post.

Self care Giveaway

Want even more self-care ideas? Check out 20 Ways to Relax Without Spending a Dime!

Read more


How to De-Stress with a Daily Tea Ritual

Drinking tea is a simple yet pleasurable experience that brings peace and joy to your day.  Enhance your tea experience by practicing simple, yet calming, mindful moments with your favorite cup of tea. Being mindful is simply a way of slowing down, being present in the moment, and savoring life. 

Next time you make a cup of tea, try preparing and drinking it thoughtfully and observe the impact the experience has on your day.

tea leaves

Touch

As you heat some water in the kettle, gather a few tea leaves in your hands and enjoy the textures and color. Using your favorite tea spoon, scoop the tea into a tea strainer and place it in your cup.  Take a moment to study the design of the spoon by keeping your awareness on the texture and patterns.

Breathe

While you wait for the tea to infuse, take a few deep, relaxing breaths. Enjoy the natural aromas of the tea with each inhale.

breathe deeply

Relax

Find a comfortable place to sit where you can relax for a few moments.  As you prepare to drink your tea, notice the warmth of the cup in your hands. Feel the soothing sensation as the tea touches your lips and fills your body with warmth with your first sip. Simply drink and enjoy without the distraction of your digital devices.

 

Looking for the perfect tea set for your daily tea ritual? Take a look at our Tea Gift Boxes--a complete set for indulging in in the ancient art of relaxation.

See related: How To Make Matcha Tea (even if you have no experience).

 daily tea ritual for stress relief

Read more

Drinking tea is a simple yet pleasurable experience that brings peace and joy to your day.  Enhance your tea experience by practicing simple, yet calming, mindful moments with your favorite cup of tea. Being mindful is simply a way of slowing down, being present in the moment, and savoring life. 

Next time you make a cup of tea, try preparing and drinking it thoughtfully and observe the impact the experience has on your day.

tea leaves

Touch

As you heat some water in the kettle, gather a few tea leaves in your hands and enjoy the textures and color. Using your favorite tea spoon, scoop the tea into a tea strainer and place it in your cup.  Take a moment to study the design of the spoon by keeping your awareness on the texture and patterns.

Breathe

While you wait for the tea to infuse, take a few deep, relaxing breaths. Enjoy the natural aromas of the tea with each inhale.

breathe deeply

Relax

Find a comfortable place to sit where you can relax for a few moments.  As you prepare to drink your tea, notice the warmth of the cup in your hands. Feel the soothing sensation as the tea touches your lips and fills your body with warmth with your first sip. Simply drink and enjoy without the distraction of your digital devices.

 

Looking for the perfect tea set for your daily tea ritual? Take a look at our Tea Gift Boxes--a complete set for indulging in in the ancient art of relaxation.

See related: How To Make Matcha Tea (even if you have no experience).

 daily tea ritual for stress relief

Read more