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How to De-Stress with a Daily Tea Ritual

Drinking tea is a simple yet pleasurable experience that brings peace and joy to your day.  Enhance your tea experience by practicing simple, yet calming, mindful moments with your favorite cup of tea. Being mindful is simply a way of slowing down, being present in the moment, and savoring life. 

Next time you make a cup of tea, try preparing and drinking it thoughtfully and observe the impact the experience has on your day.

tea leaves

Touch

As you heat some water in the kettle, gather a few tea leaves in your hands and enjoy the textures and color. Using your favorite tea spoon, scoop the tea into a tea strainer and place it in your cup.  Take a moment to study the design of the spoon by keeping your awareness on the texture and patterns.

Breathe

While you wait for the tea to infuse, take a few deep, relaxing breaths. Enjoy the natural aromas of the tea with each inhale.

breathe deeply

Relax

Find a comfortable place to sit where you can relax for a few moments.  As you prepare to drink your tea, notice the warmth of the cup in your hands. Feel the soothing sensation as the tea touches your lips and fills your body with warmth with your first sip. Simply drink and enjoy without the distraction of your digital devices.

 

Looking for the perfect tea set for your daily tea ritual? Take a look at our Tea Gift Boxes--a complete set for indulging in in the ancient art of relaxation.

See related: How To Make Matcha Tea (even if you have no experience).

 daily tea ritual for stress relief

Read more

Drinking tea is a simple yet pleasurable experience that brings peace and joy to your day.  Enhance your tea experience by practicing simple, yet calming, mindful moments with your favorite cup of tea. Being mindful is simply a way of slowing down, being present in the moment, and savoring life. 

Next time you make a cup of tea, try preparing and drinking it thoughtfully and observe the impact the experience has on your day.

tea leaves

Touch

As you heat some water in the kettle, gather a few tea leaves in your hands and enjoy the textures and color. Using your favorite tea spoon, scoop the tea into a tea strainer and place it in your cup.  Take a moment to study the design of the spoon by keeping your awareness on the texture and patterns.

Breathe

While you wait for the tea to infuse, take a few deep, relaxing breaths. Enjoy the natural aromas of the tea with each inhale.

breathe deeply

Relax

Find a comfortable place to sit where you can relax for a few moments.  As you prepare to drink your tea, notice the warmth of the cup in your hands. Feel the soothing sensation as the tea touches your lips and fills your body with warmth with your first sip. Simply drink and enjoy without the distraction of your digital devices.

 

Looking for the perfect tea set for your daily tea ritual? Take a look at our Tea Gift Boxes--a complete set for indulging in in the ancient art of relaxation.

See related: How To Make Matcha Tea (even if you have no experience).

 daily tea ritual for stress relief

Read more


To busy women that want to meditate but can't get started

Lately, there seems to be growing enthusiasm among people for engaging in meditation as a way to relieve themselves of the daily stress in their life. If you’re new to mindfulness and meditation, it probably feels like a bit of a grey area to you and you probably have a lot of questions.

What is meditation? Is it difficult to do? How long will it take? Will it help with stress-relief?

The truth about meditation is simple. There are literally hundreds of meditation techniques—many that you could learn in a few minutes and readily practice anytime, anywhere. The more you practice meditation, the greater the benefits. They key to its power lies in developing a daily habit wherein it becomes natural or second nature to carry it out to every day life.

While there are lots of different meanings and meditation practices, most often what we practice here at Pumeli is mindfulness. Mindfulness helps you to savor life, change habits, live simply and slowly, being present in everything you do.

When we practice mindfulness meditation, the form doesn’t matter as much as in other types of meditation. We’re simply trying to get to the essence of the practice and create an oasis of calm and relaxation. The most common form we practice is to focus on our breathing as we inhale and exhale. We might also think of an affirmation or mantra to say in our minds while we breathe, such as Thich Nhat Hanh’s “Breathing in, I relax my body…breathing out, I smile”. But in the end, we’re practicing mindfulness.

Why practice mindfulness through meditation? There are lots of great reasons, including:

  • It relieves stress and helps you to relax.
  • It’s easy to practice anywhere, anytime.
  • Meditation has been shown to have numerous benefits such as increased happiness and improved memory, self-control and productivity.
  • You begin to understand yourself through greater self-awareness.

The idea of being mindful or learning new habits may seem overwhelming at first. But it’s actually quite easy to do and in doing so will help you enjoy life more.

How I Learned to Meditate

Here’s a simplified approach to meditation even the busiest person can do:

1. Find a quiet spot. Try getting up a few minutes early in the morning, before others in your house awake. Or, find a park bench on your lunch break. It doesn’t really matter where you are as long as you can sit for a few minutes without being interrupted.
2. Sit comfortably. Don’t worry too much about how you sit. You don’t need any special equipment. If you like to sit on a pillow or if you prefer to sit cross-legged do what makes you comfortable.
3. Start small. Begin with just 5-10 minutes. This is really important. Even 3-4 minutes is perfect. You’ll find it’s much easier to start this way and form a long-lasting habit.
4. Focus on sound. Take a few deep breaths, close your eyes and focus on the sounds around you. What do you hear? A bird singing, the sound of the kettle in the kitchen or perhaps the absence of sound? Focus on each sound, one at a time, following it wherever it goes. If your mind starts to wander (and it will), take note of it, but gently bring it back to the sounds. Repeat this process for the few minutes you meditate. Take a few more deep breaths and gently open your eyes.

That’s it. Simple, right?

In truth, you won’t get miraculous effects after a few minutes of meditation, but you will probably feel a little more relaxed. You will have learned to notice when your mind pulls at your attention, urging you to get back to being busy. And that’s an amazing start to forming the habit of meditation.

One of the best methods for forming new habits is to commit to a monthly challenge. If you make it your only focus, you’ll get better at it and eventually you’ll get into the habit of remembering to practice mindfulness and be more present. Start small and commit to a daily habit that you do intentionally for 7 days. You’ll learn how to practice mindfulness meditation techniques. At the end of the week, you can choose to repeat the activities, or pick one or two that you enjoyed and expand upon them.

 

Read more

Lately, there seems to be growing enthusiasm among people for engaging in meditation as a way to relieve themselves of the daily stress in their life. If you’re new to mindfulness and meditation, it probably feels like a bit of a grey area to you and you probably have a lot of questions.

What is meditation? Is it difficult to do? How long will it take? Will it help with stress-relief?

The truth about meditation is simple. There are literally hundreds of meditation techniques—many that you could learn in a few minutes and readily practice anytime, anywhere. The more you practice meditation, the greater the benefits. They key to its power lies in developing a daily habit wherein it becomes natural or second nature to carry it out to every day life.

While there are lots of different meanings and meditation practices, most often what we practice here at Pumeli is mindfulness. Mindfulness helps you to savor life, change habits, live simply and slowly, being present in everything you do.

When we practice mindfulness meditation, the form doesn’t matter as much as in other types of meditation. We’re simply trying to get to the essence of the practice and create an oasis of calm and relaxation. The most common form we practice is to focus on our breathing as we inhale and exhale. We might also think of an affirmation or mantra to say in our minds while we breathe, such as Thich Nhat Hanh’s “Breathing in, I relax my body…breathing out, I smile”. But in the end, we’re practicing mindfulness.

Why practice mindfulness through meditation? There are lots of great reasons, including:

  • It relieves stress and helps you to relax.
  • It’s easy to practice anywhere, anytime.
  • Meditation has been shown to have numerous benefits such as increased happiness and improved memory, self-control and productivity.
  • You begin to understand yourself through greater self-awareness.

The idea of being mindful or learning new habits may seem overwhelming at first. But it’s actually quite easy to do and in doing so will help you enjoy life more.

How I Learned to Meditate

Here’s a simplified approach to meditation even the busiest person can do:

1. Find a quiet spot. Try getting up a few minutes early in the morning, before others in your house awake. Or, find a park bench on your lunch break. It doesn’t really matter where you are as long as you can sit for a few minutes without being interrupted.
2. Sit comfortably. Don’t worry too much about how you sit. You don’t need any special equipment. If you like to sit on a pillow or if you prefer to sit cross-legged do what makes you comfortable.
3. Start small. Begin with just 5-10 minutes. This is really important. Even 3-4 minutes is perfect. You’ll find it’s much easier to start this way and form a long-lasting habit.
4. Focus on sound. Take a few deep breaths, close your eyes and focus on the sounds around you. What do you hear? A bird singing, the sound of the kettle in the kitchen or perhaps the absence of sound? Focus on each sound, one at a time, following it wherever it goes. If your mind starts to wander (and it will), take note of it, but gently bring it back to the sounds. Repeat this process for the few minutes you meditate. Take a few more deep breaths and gently open your eyes.

That’s it. Simple, right?

In truth, you won’t get miraculous effects after a few minutes of meditation, but you will probably feel a little more relaxed. You will have learned to notice when your mind pulls at your attention, urging you to get back to being busy. And that’s an amazing start to forming the habit of meditation.

One of the best methods for forming new habits is to commit to a monthly challenge. If you make it your only focus, you’ll get better at it and eventually you’ll get into the habit of remembering to practice mindfulness and be more present. Start small and commit to a daily habit that you do intentionally for 7 days. You’ll learn how to practice mindfulness meditation techniques. At the end of the week, you can choose to repeat the activities, or pick one or two that you enjoyed and expand upon them.

 

Read more


How To Fit Time For You Into Your Busy Schedule

Most of us these days are far too connected. Texting, emails, co-working spaces, Wi-Fi, and apps consume our days - and our nights. Even when we "take a break", it's often to post a photo to Instagram, update a status on Facebook, or stream music or videos to our tablets or smart-TVs. It's really a little overwhelming.

And if we are able to consciously see how overwhelming it is from within our personal tornado of technological busyness, imagine how our subconscious feels being constantly bombarded, able to pick up on every passing thing that we have learned to ignore. It's not good for the spirit or our health to be so busy. We need some relaxation, some real downtime, away from the incessant barrage of the modern world. We need some reality.

To do this we have to unplug, and we have to do it on purpose.

5-minute rituals: how to make time for you in your busy schedule.

Decide to set aside some time when there will be no television, no radio, no Internet via smartphone or tablet or laptop, and no interruptions either by phone or in person. Though fitting this time for you into your busy schedule may seem overwhelming at first, it’s easier if you start small. Begin with just 5-10 minutes per day. By allowing yourself to focus on something small, you give yourself the best chance for success.

Establish a ritual during that time frame that will support mindfulness. If you simply try to be quiet for that time you'll likely end up getting antsy thinking about what you're going to do as soon as the time is up, and that could derail your attempts to make time for relaxation. Here is a simple meditation using one of the five senses you can try to get some sort of routine established.


SMELL MEDITATION

Select something that evokes a happy memory—your favorite scented flower, a candle, an old book, or a jar of your favorite dried spice or loose leaf tea, for example. Use your scented object to create a signal to slow down and invoke feelings of happiness and relaxation in the middle of the day.

When things start to feel rushed, pause and sit in a comfortable position. Hold the scent to your nose, and inhale deeply three times. Let the scent summon your happy memory.

Focus on the scent and how you feel. Don’t analyze anything; just absorb the smell and enjoy the memories.

This type of activity will improve your health, your attitude, and your general outlook on life over time. For more insights and tips on practicing mindful living, see 3 Ways To Start A Ritual And Lead a More Mindful Life.

 


Read more

Most of us these days are far too connected. Texting, emails, co-working spaces, Wi-Fi, and apps consume our days - and our nights. Even when we "take a break", it's often to post a photo to Instagram, update a status on Facebook, or stream music or videos to our tablets or smart-TVs. It's really a little overwhelming.

And if we are able to consciously see how overwhelming it is from within our personal tornado of technological busyness, imagine how our subconscious feels being constantly bombarded, able to pick up on every passing thing that we have learned to ignore. It's not good for the spirit or our health to be so busy. We need some relaxation, some real downtime, away from the incessant barrage of the modern world. We need some reality.

To do this we have to unplug, and we have to do it on purpose.

5-minute rituals: how to make time for you in your busy schedule.

Decide to set aside some time when there will be no television, no radio, no Internet via smartphone or tablet or laptop, and no interruptions either by phone or in person. Though fitting this time for you into your busy schedule may seem overwhelming at first, it’s easier if you start small. Begin with just 5-10 minutes per day. By allowing yourself to focus on something small, you give yourself the best chance for success.

Establish a ritual during that time frame that will support mindfulness. If you simply try to be quiet for that time you'll likely end up getting antsy thinking about what you're going to do as soon as the time is up, and that could derail your attempts to make time for relaxation. Here is a simple meditation using one of the five senses you can try to get some sort of routine established.


SMELL MEDITATION

Select something that evokes a happy memory—your favorite scented flower, a candle, an old book, or a jar of your favorite dried spice or loose leaf tea, for example. Use your scented object to create a signal to slow down and invoke feelings of happiness and relaxation in the middle of the day.

When things start to feel rushed, pause and sit in a comfortable position. Hold the scent to your nose, and inhale deeply three times. Let the scent summon your happy memory.

Focus on the scent and how you feel. Don’t analyze anything; just absorb the smell and enjoy the memories.

This type of activity will improve your health, your attitude, and your general outlook on life over time. For more insights and tips on practicing mindful living, see 3 Ways To Start A Ritual And Lead a More Mindful Life.

 


Read more


3 Ways To Boost Happiness At Work

As a busy professional it's important to take time for yourself. Being constantly connected and on-the-go can leave you feeling exhausted and over time can be destructive to your health, relationships and career.  Many successful leaders are turning to simple mindful techniques that are easy to fit into a daily office routine. Try them and you'll be left feeling relaxed, recharged and able to achieve your goals without sacrificing yourself.

Here are three ways to help you practice mindfulness and feel happier at work:

3 ways to boost happiness at work

1. Keep a small journal with you and if you're feeling stressed write down what you're worried about or what's distracting you. By acknowledging the issues, you take control. Don't let the problem escalate and don't start thinking of solutions in the heat of the moment. Simply jot it down on paper, take notice of how it makes you feel, and then let it go. You might even want to crumple up the paper, physically tossing away the worry.

2. Take three­-minute breathing breaks, in which you think of nothing other than your breathing. Take these breaks several times a day. Fit them in each time you’re about to get up to get a glass of water, or right before you're ready to get on a conference call with a client. You can even set the phone alarm every two or three hours as a reminder. The breathing breaks will clear the noise out of your head and help you feel calm, confident, and ready to make smart decisions.

3. Take a walk. That might sound tough to do in the middle of a hectic day, but how about scheduling your next meeting out of the office? For example, instead of holding your next one­-on­-one meeting with a team member in your office, suggest meeting at the café down the street. Walk silently to the meeting by yourself and that idea that's been escaping you all day? It just might find you while you're outside listening to a bird or simply breathing in the fresh air.

Practicing these short focused moments doesn't require any special equipment and can do wonders for your mood, which will help you be your best, both at work and at home.

 

Read more

As a busy professional it's important to take time for yourself. Being constantly connected and on-the-go can leave you feeling exhausted and over time can be destructive to your health, relationships and career.  Many successful leaders are turning to simple mindful techniques that are easy to fit into a daily office routine. Try them and you'll be left feeling relaxed, recharged and able to achieve your goals without sacrificing yourself.

Here are three ways to help you practice mindfulness and feel happier at work:

3 ways to boost happiness at work

1. Keep a small journal with you and if you're feeling stressed write down what you're worried about or what's distracting you. By acknowledging the issues, you take control. Don't let the problem escalate and don't start thinking of solutions in the heat of the moment. Simply jot it down on paper, take notice of how it makes you feel, and then let it go. You might even want to crumple up the paper, physically tossing away the worry.

2. Take three­-minute breathing breaks, in which you think of nothing other than your breathing. Take these breaks several times a day. Fit them in each time you’re about to get up to get a glass of water, or right before you're ready to get on a conference call with a client. You can even set the phone alarm every two or three hours as a reminder. The breathing breaks will clear the noise out of your head and help you feel calm, confident, and ready to make smart decisions.

3. Take a walk. That might sound tough to do in the middle of a hectic day, but how about scheduling your next meeting out of the office? For example, instead of holding your next one­-on­-one meeting with a team member in your office, suggest meeting at the café down the street. Walk silently to the meeting by yourself and that idea that's been escaping you all day? It just might find you while you're outside listening to a bird or simply breathing in the fresh air.

Practicing these short focused moments doesn't require any special equipment and can do wonders for your mood, which will help you be your best, both at work and at home.

 

Read more


3 Ways To Start A Ritual And Lead a More Mindful Life

We often associate a ritual with special occasions or rites of passage. In reality, everyday life is made up of rituals—activities that keep us happy, grounded, calm and organized.

Read more

We often associate a ritual with special occasions or rites of passage. In reality, everyday life is made up of rituals—activities that keep us happy, grounded, calm and organized.

Read more